Despite the rain, Algonquin Park remains fairly dry.

David Legros of the Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks says water levels are low in lake and rivers. He says some canoe routes might not be active in the area due to low levels. He says there are reports of low water levels in the Tim River area, and the Canoe lake area, plus low water between Vanishing Pond and Little Pond, Bartlett and Willow lake, and between Potter Creek and Head Creek. Legros says in these areas, you will have to drag or carry your canoe if you wish to traverse them.

Legros says that because Algonquin Park is on top of a big granite hill, water levels fluctuate during the year. Snow melt and rain in the spring can last until late summer, but not if the weather has been hot or dry. Depend on the time of year, parts of the park will have localized weather. He says fluctuation is normal, but there is no uniform water level optimal for the park. Legros says that weather isn’t the only factor in water levels. Beaver dams can also affect water in the park, sometimes turning a hefty creek into a trickle downstream.

Aside from recreational problems, Legros says lower water levels can also cause problems for plants. Periods of drought can dry out plants, and decrease their overall health. He adds however that most plants are fairly well adapted to drought-like conditions in the park.